B&B in a Beautiful Country Manor House

Introduction

Gwern Borter, offering bed and breakfast (B&B) in Conwy is set in ten acres of landscaped grounds with ornamental, organic kitchen and medicinal herb gardens. We take pride in retaining the Manor's 'Olde Worlde' charm.

Having spent much of our lives at a busy city pace, our aim was to create a perfect Bed and Breakfast rural retreat in Snowdonia, North Wales. We offer the warmest welcome, personal service and a hearty choice of breakfasts. The Manor is run very much as a 'home' that takes guests where you will find all the ambience of a good country house hotel.

All rooms enjoy splendid views of the countryside, and include a flat screen TV/DVD, a DVD library with Sky Free View, hair dryers, tea coffee and hot chocolate drinks with assorted chocolates and biscuits.

B&B Special Offers

The longer you stay the less you pay per night. Book online

Book direct on our site for the best deal.

We will always beat late offers on other sites.

Gwern Borter Manor Accommodation

Superior Triple

Superior Triple large light room with views from 2 sides one of the mountains and the other of our paddocks.

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Lilly Langtry Two Room Suite

Large Luxury double, two room accommodation with a lovely bedroom, en-suite shower and large lounge.

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Our oak panelled entrance hall and staircase has an intriguing collection of original oils and limited editions.

The relaxing ambience makes Gwern Borter Manor the ideal place to relax and unwind. As a quiet rural retreat, we do not take children under six or dogs in the house, so a peacefull break at our accommodation is guaranteed.

Our cosy communal guest lounge is a place you can connect to the Wi-Fi network.

Gwern Borter Dining Room Gwern Borter Hall

Gwern Borter Manor History

Gwern Borter Manor as it stands now dates back to 1850 and is an extension onto an original smaller building. One of the early owners was Thomas Evans Esq. from Haydock, who sold it by public auction at the Castle Hotel in Conwy on 18th October 1889 along with many other large country estates in this area thereby disposing of all his property in North Wales.

Suit of Armour

Gwern Borter along with much of the surrounding land was owned by George Barker around the turn of the century and this was used as a Hunting Lodge until his death in 1909. His son Thomas and his family occupied the house in 1911 and he lived there until his death in 1941.

One of the quirks of either George or his son Thomas was to top all the entrances to his property with a quartz pyramid on the gateposts which can be seen all around the locality, this stems from the Greek mythology that crystal kept away bad omens. The lane leading to the Manor was built by Thomas in 1920 who of course named it after himself, Barkers Lane.

It is said that George Barker's close relationship with Lord Leicester led to his close contact with the Prince of Wales, Albert Edward (Bertie), later Edward VII, who used Gwern Borter for his liaisons with Lilly Langtree, his most famous mistress.

Their main retreat would have been in their Bournemouth house now the Lilly Langtree Hotel, but in his travels around the country the hunting lodge in the Conwy Valley would have been a superb place to be entertained.. Conformation he had connections to the family was that he made a John Barker founder the Barker department store in Knightsbridge a Baronet.

After several changes of owners the Manor was purchased by Air Commodore Robinson in 1956. The Manor then became the Conwy Valley Mink Farm and was so successful it became one of the leading producers of mink fur in Europe.

After the Air Commodore's death in 1977 the mink farm finished and the Manor and out buildings ran into serious dilapidation for 10 years until we purchased it in 1987. At this time the out buildings were what remained of the infrastructure of all it took to produce top quality fur, the top paddock was called the mink field and had all the old mink cages still in place. They were soon removed as was all other evidence.

From 1987 it took 7 years to convert it into its present form as a holiday destination.